Category Archives: Weekly Feature

Community Adult ESL Recruitment and Retention

by Zachary Smith With the rising numbers of migrant and immigrant families joining our communities, states are increasing funding for community ELL courses. Initially, this is viewed as a positive way to spend state funding. However, there are facts that can make recruiting members of these populations difficult, and once the classes are full, many other factors lead to issues ... Read More »

Facing Formal Academic Speaking Tasks with Growing Comfort

by Ziyun Chen I took my first public speaking class in English four years ago. On the first day, the instructor gave us his requirement – to give presentations without notes in hand. I remember how stressed everyone was with fear and anxiety about forgetting lines. Our instructor expected us to prepare a draft and warned us to revise our ... Read More »

#MIDTESOL16jazz

It’s MIDTESOL conference time! This year’s theme, “Innovation and Improvisation” was selected to highlight Kansas City’s role as a “cradle of jazz.” To spotlight how this conference promotes the innovation and improvisation of ideas in the field of English language teaching, we are introducing the #MIDTESOL16jazz hashtag. Please share on social media like Twitter, Instagram, or Facebook when you encounter ... Read More »

2016 MIDTESOL Awards

by Denise Mussman, Awards Chair This year has been an exciting one when it comes to MIDTESOL awards. As our conference attendance and membership has grown, we have added new awards and expanded others. Here’s an update on the conference-related awards for 2016. Essay Awards Last spring, we had our annual essay contest for K-12 ESL students. All three questions ... Read More »

What to Do in Kansas City

🎵 “Kansas City, here I come!” 🎵 Those of you getting ready for #MIDTESOL16 may be humming the words of this well-known jazz song, but have you decided on what you’ll do for entertainment while in Kansas City? Conference Venue The Kansas City Marriott Downtown is in the heart of the city within walking distance of the Power and Light ... Read More »

Customizing Your MIDTESOL Experience via Interest Sections

What are Interest Sections? To better meet the needs of a diverse membership, MIDTESOL offers five different Interest Sections focused on professional areas within English language teaching (ELT): Community College / Adult Education Educational Technology (#EdTech) Higher Education / Teacher Training Intensive English Program (IEP) K12 Each Interest Section (IS) elects its own chair to lead the group and represent ... Read More »

Tech Gear-up for #MIDTESOL16

To get the most out of the #MIDTESOL16 conference experience, consider the following three technology tools and tips on how to use them before, during, and after the conference. CVENT – Our conference website provides you with a wealth of information at your fingertips including: featured speaker biographies conference agenda including hosted dinners overview of venue – Kansas City Marriott ... Read More »

EdTech Bazaar: New Technology Showcase at #MIDTESOL16

by Katie McClintic & Summer Peixoto, EdTech IS Co-Chairs The Educational Technology Interest Section (EdTech IS) is excited to present the FIRST ever EdTech Bazaar at the MIDTESOL 2016 conference. The EdTech Bazaar will give participants opportunities to view demonstrations of how educators are using emerging and existing technology in new ways to enhance English language learning. The demonstrations will ... Read More »

Summer School Connects to Students’ Backgrounds

by Jamie Cardwell During the summer of 2016, the students at the Ritenour International Welcome Center (IWC) in Ritenour, Missouri, read Sonia Nazario’s novel, Enrique’s Journey, in both English and Spanish. Through the use of Google classroom, the students met four days a week for three hours a day to read, write, listen, and speak about their experiences. Being newcomers ... Read More »

Advocacy for English Learners

by Adrienne Johnson While in the classroom, I remember many conversations with colleagues about how politicians seem not to understand what it is like to teach and work with high-need students. We discussed how frustrated we were, but we never felt as if we could create change at the state and national levels – we thought that was beyond our ... Read More »